A few questions about life in the Royal Navy

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by Eggy_Russ, Jan 22, 2015.

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  1. Hello, I'm 16 have passed all my tests interviews etc, and have received a date In which I will start basic training at Raleigh. Which hopefully after I pass I'll go onto the technical bit (AET). I have been told that life in navy is great meeting new people, travelling the world and receive a good trade and pay out of it which all sounds great and I wish I can be a part of that. But then there's the negative side I always hear, for example people leaving the navy early, months away from home, the 'pettiness' of the Royal Navy. And much more. To be honest at this moment in time I feel I'm alright with the negatives as I'm still young, but I'm just hoping how I feel right now ( which is positive ) wont change afterwards. So am I right to be slightly worried? I'm really looking forwards to it! I'm just trying not to be naive in thinking that the RN is going to be all fun and everything is going to be fine. I understand any job there will always be negatives. But RN does sound more exiting! Am I right thinking this?

    Thanks

    Just realised I posted this on the current affairs part -_- gunna re post this on a better forum...
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2015
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  2. Hello, I'm 16 have passed all my tests interviews etc, and have received a date In which I will start basic training at Raleigh. Which hopefully after I pass I'll go onto the technical bit (AET). I have been told that life in navy is great meeting new people, travelling the world and receive a good trade and pay out of it which all sounds great and I wish I can be a part of that. But then there's the negative side I always hear, for example people leaving the navy early, months away from home, the 'pettiness' of the Royal Navy. And much more. To be honest at this moment in time I feel I'm alright with the negatives as I'm still young, but I'm just hoping how I feel right now ( which is positive ) wont change afterwards. So am I right to be slightly worried? I'm really looking forwards to it! I'm just trying not to be naive in thinking that the RN is going to be all fun and everything is going to be fine. I understand any job there will always be negatives. But RN does sound more exiting! Am I right thinking this?

    Thanks
     
  3. All work in any military force has its peaks and troughs - it comes with the territory.
    You'll be happy, miserable, fed up, looking forward to something, not liking what's
    going to happen next, busy, idle, having a good time, working like a trojan, sleeping,
    not sleeping, getting brownie points, getting bollocked, getting paid, being skint,
    going home, not seeing home for yonks, getting your sea legs, falling down hatches
    and ending up in sickbay, freezing, suffering from sunstroke, on patrol, on leave,
    on watch, adrift, trapping foreign women, getting filled in by foreign womens
    jealous boyfriends and probably losing at least one ID Card.
    Go with the flow, accept it for what it is, get through Raleigh and way in the future,
    you'll be starting conversations with the immortal words;
    "When I was on the *******..."
    Good luck and have a great Naval life.

    BNM (22 years done - 2 years surface, 20 years submarine).

    (Click link and read about one ships adventures).

    https://www.gov.uk/government/world-location-news/hms-daring-bound-for-japan
     
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  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    As with any job there are positives and negatives. For as long as the good outweighs the perceived bad, people stay. I've served 33 years and am getting to like it.

    The average sailor serves around six years - this has been the average for many years. What causes most people to leave is the change in personal circumstances. As time progresses and you perhaps find the right partner, want to settle down, maybe have a family, buy a house, etc., your personal priorities may change and the service life of separation can become a strain.

    In many cases, as you adapt to the service way of life and begin to enjoy it, maybe start progressing through the rates (ranks), earning more money, taking more responsibility, you may find you wish to stay longer - many do just that. Those who avoid responsibilities and moan the loudest are the ones most likely to leave the soonest although rest assured there are those who are seemingly never happy, always moan, but don't leave!

    As an AET, in my experience, the thing that surprises many is it maybe several years before they get a frontline, seagoing draft and the turmoil of this in relation to the stability and privacy of living in Single Living Accommodation, working days only, weekends off, etc,. Comes as a bit of a shock for some.

    My advice is join with an open mind, remember there are menial aspects to every job and this includes clearing-up after yourself. If you think you can do the job better than your line manager, don't moan about it, become that line manager!

    Most of all enjoy your job and make the most of it. Looking back, most people regret leaving and AFCOs are full of those applying to rejoin because they thought the grass was greener.

    Good luck!
     
  5. Thanks for the support and replies! The reason I've posted this is because both of my cousins were in the navy, one was a submariner and the the other WE. Now one left after 4/5 years and the other thinking of quitting after getting told he's got to go to lovely Scotland for months! But to be honest Isn't this moment I don't see myself quitting.
     
  6. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    The nature of the job is such that unfortunately the needs of the service may take preference to the desires of the individual. There's nothing more galling than beginning to settle at one end of the country, then receiving an assignment order at the other end of the country. That's the time when you may well decide the negatives outweigh the positives, depending on your long term priorities. There's not much point being angry or bitter about it, it's made clear from the outset & you are free to join & free to leave under the terms of your contract.

    Like many, I submitted notice to quit whilst frustrated but changed my mind when I weighed-up the good and bad. Fortunately I was permitted to withdraw my notice - many aren't. A lot of people leave in their early years due to partner pressure - some don't look back, many regret it.

    The bottom line is it is job, not conscription, nor youth entertainment scheme and it involves going to sea.
     
  7. That's a very good point.
     
  8. And there is nothing wrong with leaving either. Do it until you stop enjoying it, then leave; don't make yourself miserable.
     
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  9. Purple_twiglet

    Purple_twiglet War Hero Moderator

    I'd echo ATGs excellent point. I did 16 years part time. Loved the first 12, hated the last 4. Left a few weeks ago and bluntly wish I'd done it 4 years earlier. You'll get great experiences, but the moment it stops working for you, and giving you what you want from it, thats probably time to move on.
     
  10. Iv got the same raleigh date as you eggy.
     
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  11. Enjoy the life.
    In the days of conscription where everyone had to serve two years (National Service) there wee two types of conscripts, those that went in determined to enjoy the experience and those who fought hammer and tooth to try not to.
    Most of those who went in with a positive attitude enjoyed their two years the others did not.
     
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  12. Echoing the above, I did just over 33 years and, for me, the positives outweighed the negatives although I did come very close to quitting a couple of times but that's true of every job. The last 3 - 4 years I'd had enough but I was close to finishing anyway so there was no point putting my notice in.

    I don't have any regrets with anything I did during my time but there's many things I would have done differently with the benefit of hindsight.
     
  13. i'll be seeing you at Raleigh hopefully, i'm AET as well.
     
  14. You are right to be apprehensive as for a 16 year old it is a big step into the wider world. It is for you a big adventure take control of the moment and enjoy what you can.
    One chap where I work did 8 years and his wife put pressure on him to leave, he is now nearly 60 and still regrets leaving.
    So when the crap gets more than the enjoyment, only you can take stock and choose Navy or not
    I survived 24year 12 Ships 12 Submarines no regrets with my service life, but at 40 years old it was time for me to leave, politely telling the Navy what to do with their extended service.
    Have a positive attitude and enjoy most that leave miss the camaraderie and not the job.
     
  15. Yeah 26th April! Got my RNAC in a weeks time.
     
  16. good luck mate, iv'e got mine on the 9th of feb
     
  17. Just like to say Eggy_Russ, your initial post (and your replies after) was well written and to me shows that you have a good head on your shoulders. There have been lots of prospective joiners on here asking stupid questions, using 'text' talk and generally not liking what the 'older' members have to say.

    Take in what Ninja and others have said above, also personalities count a great deal and yours comes over as seeming to be in the right frame.

    Apart from the AET / WAFU bit of course but you can't have everything!;)
     
  18. Thanks :) means a lot!
     
  19. Correction* my RNAC is actually on the 9th feb! You travelling far?
     
  20. ah i'll see you there too then! No not far at all, are you going to collingwood for it?
     

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