A few questions about joining the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm

codbutt

Midshipman
Re: A few questions about joining the Royal Navy Fleet Air A

Really, you want to decide which of these things you want, as you are unlikely to get both.

The ideal thing would be for you to end up as a pilot on a Commando air squadron and then do the all-arms course, but believe me, if you join the Navy and want nothing more than to fly Commando, you'll end up on a Merlin in no time.

It depends a lot on you as a pilot - there are a certain set of attributes they look for in Junglie pilots, and if you're not it, and there aren't slots for students when you finish your course, you won't go Commando. But then, who knows, you might be just the man.

My advice would be to do some flying, and also do some Booty acquaint stuff - find out which you like better - then put heart and soul into getting into RM or RN. Once you're in, which believe me, takes some doing, then look at combining these aspirations of yours, if you still have them by then.

I have met a few people who are half-booty and half-pilot, but I've met a hell of a lot more folks who are 100% one or the other.
 

Skanza

Midshipman
Re: A few questions about joining the Royal Navy Fleet Air A

codbutt said:
Really, you want to decide which of these things you want, as you are unlikely to get both.

The ideal thing would be for you to end up as a pilot on a Commando air squadron and then do the all-arms course, but believe me, if you join the Navy and want nothing more than to fly Commando, you'll end up on a Merlin in no time.

It depends a lot on you as a pilot - there are a certain set of attributes they look for in Junglie pilots, and if you're not it, and there aren't slots for students when you finish your course, you won't go Commando. But then, who knows, you might be just the man.

My advice would be to do some flying, and also do some Booty acquaint stuff - find out which you like better - then put heart and soul into getting into RM or RN. Once you're in, which believe me, takes some doing, then look at combining these aspirations of yours, if you still have them by then.

I have met a few people who are half-booty and half-pilot, but I've met a hell of a lot more folks who are 100% one or the other.

Thank's for the response!
 

avoiding_action

Lantern Swinger
Piran said:
From what I understand, if you join as a Bootie officer, then you do your first tour as a Troop commander. Then you may choose to specialise. Don't forget the RM's use the Gazelle as a scout Heli. If your good enough as a pilot, then you can expect to be cherry picked for Harriers (I would say fast jet, but their not!), regardless of how you joined up.

If you want to get your Green lid, then yes you can after you joined, but as others have said, you'll need to get time away from your job to do it.

As with all of us in the services, you can ask to go somewhere, but there are no gurantees :)

No Gazelles anymore!

It's Lynx Mk7 with 847 NAS or Sea king Mk4 with the junglies. Although a Booty recently got a DFC flying a CH47!
 

bruiser_loose

Midshipman
Skanza - I concur with Codbutt. You have to choose what you want to do - be a RM officer or pilot in the FAA. The armed forces are not here to fulfill every little boys dream and give them every job that they ever wanted.

A few, and I stress a few, RM Officers get the opportunity to undertake pilot training. Those good enough, like PK, go on to become Harrier jocks but the majority will end up on 847 or 845/6. There have even been a couple who have flown grey Lynx.

If you go RN pilot, there may be opportunities to get a crack at the AACC but you need to be in the right job or going to a job that needs the qualification. Long gone are the days when you could apply to do the course for kudos or sh*ts and giggles. Nowadays every penny needs to be accounted for.

It also needs to be pointed out that you are interested in the 2 branches with (possibly) the highest chop rates in the RN. People who get through to become RM officers and FAA Aircrew have worked bloody hard to get there and are proud members of their respective clubs. IIRC the statistic for FAA Aircrew is for every 200 who go to a careers office and apply for pilot/observer, 1 person will end up in the cockpit of a front line aircraft.
 
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